Western Influence in Ottoman Lands
Jordan
‘In Jordan the Western artistic characteristics of the Ottoman period are mainly represented in naturalistic scenes that were not previously part of the visual language known to the Ottomans.’
In Jordan the Western artistic characteristics of the Ottoman period are mainly represented in naturalistic scenes that were not previously part of the visual language known to the Ottomans. These scenes were painted by European artists who brought with them new artistic elements that they skillfully integrated with the artistic works they implemented in Jordan Also during this period the utilization of Western coins with human figurative motifs was frequently used, more than the Ottoman coins. People preferred Western artifacts, in particular the coins, which they used as adornments, specifically for necklaces, chin-chains and veils. They also decorated their houses, churches and buildings with fresco paintings created by western artists. Some of these buildings later became museums and many of the churches are still in use today, while others continue to be the homes of private owners whom conserve and restore them.
Even after the decline of the Ottoman Empire, Jordanians still appreciated Western and Ottoman coins and women still wore gold pendants and bracelets adorned with the coins of King George V and Sultan Muhammad Rashad V that had been gifts to them as dowries. This heritage still exists at the Folkloric Museum and some still belong to the successors of these old families.
Abu Jaber's house, fresco paintings of naturalistic scenes

AH 1309-25 / AD 1892-1908
Ottoman
Salt City, Jordan
Naturalistic scenes painted by the European artist Menlk from the ceiling of Abu Jaber's house in Salt City.